Dustin Hines

The brain operates as a complex orchestration that involves many different cellular players. Dr. Dustin Hines’ research is aimed at understanding the role that glial cells play under normal and pathological conditions, which include neuropsychiatric disorders (depression), traumatic brain injury, stroke and Alzheimer disease. In particular, Dr. Hines researches how astrocytes and microglia cells both talk and listen to neurons. Dr. Hines employs molecular genetics, biochemistry, confocal and two photon microscopy, electrophysiology and behavioral assessments in mouse models to gain understanding of how glia cells impact brain signaling, circuitry and behavior. Dr. Hines’ research ultimately is directed towards understanding how all of the cells of the brain are orchestrated into the precise symphony that we call behavior.

Yu Kuang

Dr Kuang is currently the Lincy Endowed Assistant Professor and American Board Radiology board certified therapeutic medical physicist in the CAMPEP accredited Medical Physics Program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). He obtained his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2009 and completed my medical physics postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan in 2010 and Stanford University in 2012. His clinical emphasis is on the routine external beam radiotherapy physics practice and SBRT techniques. His research focuses on the development and clinical integration of novel medical imaging devices with medical linear accelerator and proton therapy device; real-time image guided and adaptive radiation therapy; combining biological- and imaging- biomarkers for early detection of cancers and cancer Interventions; nanotechnology and its application in imaging and therapeutics; molecular imaging for radiation biology and clinical applications.

Brendan Morris

research in computationally efficient intelligent systems. The lab combines computer vision, machine learning, and pattern recognition to develop “real” solutions. Intelligent systems are those that are able to observe the world, learn from these observations, and understand the environment. The real-time systems are designed to operate continuously and robustly through all operating modes.

Research areas of interest include traffic monitoring and pedestrian safety, activity analysis and assessment, visual object recognition, self-driving cars.

Helen J. Wing

Helen J. Wing is an Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She obtained her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Birmingham (UK) in 1997, where she studied transcriptional gene regulation in Escherichia coli. She worked with both Prof. Stephen J.W. Busby and Prof. John R. Guest in her first post-doctoral position, where she employed biochemical approaches to study transcription. In 2000, Helen moved to the U.S. to take a post-doctoral position with Marcia B. Goldberg M.D. at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. It was here that she became interested in the transcriptional regulation of Shigella virulence genes and antimicrobial peptides. She joined the faculty at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2005.
The primary focus of my research laboratory is virulence gene expression in the bacterial pathogen Shigella flexneri, the causal agent of bacillary dysentery, which is estimated to kill over 1 million people each year. All four species of Shigella harbor a large virulence plasmid, which carries most of the genes required to cause disease in the human host, including those required for invasion, type III secretion and actin-based motility, a process that allows bacteria to spread from one human cell to another. We are interested in the environmental cues, the timing and the molecular events that trigger the expression of virulence genes. We are particularly interested in the complex interplay between nucleoid structuring proteins, proteins that facilitate the packaging of DNA into tiny cells, and the transcriptional regulators of virulence in Shigella VirF and VirB.

Amber Howerton

Dr. Howerton is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Nevada State College.  Dr. Howerton is actively involved in undergraduate research both as independent studies during the school year and as a mentor in summer NSF-INBRE.  Her research centers around sporulating bacteria (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium difficile).  Her students have studied germination kinetics to identify activation and inhibition compounds, synthesized potential spore germination inhibitors and studied the inflammation response initiated by these bacterial toxins and spore proteins. Also, as a researcher of C. diff,  she is interested in the microbiome of the intestine before and after antibiotic use.  Her students have studied bile salt hydrolases and their expression before and after rodents are treated with antibiotics. It is possible these enzymes play some role in the observable different susceptibility of rodents to C.diff.  She is always up for new adventures if students present me with a workable research proposal!

Trabia Mohamed

Overview of current research projects:

Optimization Algorithms and their Applications to Mechanical Engineering Design
Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Components and Systems
Dynamic Analysis and Control of Mechanical Systems with Emphasis on Flexible Robots
Analysis and Design of Robots and Mechanisms
Biomedical applications of mechanical design
Characterization of biomaterials
Shock Transmission
Characterization of Material Properties under Impact Loading.
Fuzzy Logic Control Applications.

Chad Cross

Dr. Cross is trained as a multidisciplinary scientist and holds advanced degrees in statistics, the life sciences, and the social sciences. He works professionally as a statistician and data scientist, and have particular interest in applied biostatistics, nonparametric methods, multivariate methods, research design and sampling methodology, analysis of messy data, complex analysis of big data, pattern recognition, data science, statistical genetics, computer programming, and mathematics/statistics education. His research consistently has focused on working with multidisciplinary research teams to bring statistical and analytical expertise to novel and interesting research questions. He applies his quantitative work broadly in the biological sciences, medicine, and psychology.