Erica Marti

Dr. Erica Marti’s main research interests are in water and wastewater treatment, especially in the area of transforming wastewater for a beneficial reuse (drinking water, irrigation water, etc.). Past work has included understanding the formation of unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and investigating different methods to prevent their formation. DBPs are created when water is disinfected with chemical oxidants like different forms of chlorine and ozone. We use the chemicals to inactivate pathogens (bacteria, viruses, etc.) but the chemicals can react with other dissolved organics and inorganics to create unwanted byproducts, some of which are toxic. Therefore, water treatment professionals must work carefully to provide the right amount of oxidant for disinfection while minimizing DBPs.
Future research topics include remediation of polluted groundwater, adsorption of heavy metals from wastewater using biochar made from agricultural waste products, uptake of DBPs in plants grown using treated wastewater, and optimizing toxicity assays for DBPs.
Dr. Marti also conducts research in the area of STEM education and has led several Teacher Professional Development programs for integrated STEM lessons and engineering design.

Shahab Tayeb

My research interests span communications, complex networks, and network security. I particularly plan to investigate network protocols (e.g. emerging wireless communications standards), big data analytics, the security and privacy of the Internet of Things and Cyber Physical Systems (e.g. Smart City).

Jacque Ewing-Taylor

As the Institutional Grants Coordinator, Jacque Ewing-Taylor brings together interdisciplinary research teams to respond to high-profile grant Requests For Proposal (RFPs) and coordinates the support for proposal review.

Ewing-Taylor also holds the position of associate director of the Raggio Research Center for STEM Education. The Raggio Center is focused on the educational aspects of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) such as professional development for educators and improving instruction for students.

A major function of the center is supporting the evaluation portion of the grant process and this correlates to Ewing-Taylor’s primary research interest—studying professional development strategies that best increase teacher effectiveness. Ewing-Taylor points out that, “kids are natural scientists” and she is focused on finding the best ways to develop those tendencies.

Patrick Naranjo

Many students enter a university setting with tremendous trepidation about whether they belong, doubts about their chances of success, and a conspicuous lack of knowledge about the college experience.

Patrick Naranjo serves as a mentor for students at UNLV and utilizes his Native American perspective and academic background to provide guidance that can reinforce both the cultural and academic achievements of students at UNLV.

Mr. Naranjo’s goal is to help the University develop cultural and social capacity for teaching Native American and other underrepresented minority students methods to adapt in culturally responsive ways and ultimately succeed in higher education.

Patrick is a member of Santa Clara Pueblo, an expert in Native American cultural property protection, and Resource Coordinator for The Intersection. He earned his B.A. from Haskell Indian Nations University and his M.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Lawrence Rudd

Dr. Rudd’s professional interests are in the areas of science education and geomorphology. By following these interests throughout his life, Dr. Rudd has been involved in a delightful combination of learning, researching, and teaching. Regardless of what he is teaching, Dr. Rudd never fails to use science examples and demonstrations to keep learning active. An ardent believer in inquiry-based learning, students in Dr. Rudd’s classes learn science and science teaching methods through active participation in class activities.

Dr. Rudd has wide-ranging experience in education, including 20 years of teaching high school earth science, physics, and geology in Portland, Maine, Pinon, Arizona, and Tucson, Arizona. In Pinon, Arizona Dr. Rudd taught in the first high school built in a remote part of the Navajo nation. Working with diverse student populations is one of Dr. Rudd’s lifelong interests.

In addition to teaching education classes at Nevada State College Dr. Rudd maintains an active interest in the study of landslides and other Earth surface processes and thoroughly enjoys being able to do field work in Southern Nevada and the nearby Colorado Plateau.

Scott Mensing

Dr. Mensing is a biogeographer and paleoecologist. He has extensive experience reconstructing Quaternary environments in the Great Basin and California . His primary research tools are pollen and charcoal analysis and he maintains the department palynology laboratory. He also has experience with tree ring analysis and woodrat middens. He enjoys field work and is always anxious to explore new corners in the intermountain west.