Rubab Saher

My research mainly focuses on urban irrigation water management using remote sensing datasets. I am primarily interested in improving the existing physical process for urban landscapes in the hope of saving water in arid cities.

Erin Hannon

Erin Hannon is faculty in the Psychological and Brain Sciences department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She received a Ph.D. Experimental Psychology in 2005 from Cornell University. Her research program combines her interests in cognition, culture, infant and child development, music and dance, and language. Her research examines how an individual’s culture-specific listening experiences influence his or her perception of music, the similarities and differences between musical and linguistic skills as they develop and perhaps interact during infancy and childhood, how we acquire the ability to move in time with music, and how developmental milestones in music perception might be related to other social, cognitive, and linguistic abilities and behaviors.

Renato Liboro

Dr. Renato (Rainier) Liboro purposefully chose to pursue and obtain his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Community Psychology because it is the one sub-discipline in Psychology that distinctly espouses the principles, traditions, and practices of research collaboration, diversity, inclusion, equity, social justice, community engagement, civic participation, stakeholder partnership, and capacity-building. As a community-based researcher and scholar who openly identifies as a person of color, a sexual minority, an immigrant, and an older adult, Dr. Liboro recognizes all too well the significance and inherent value of having intersecting identities, diverse personal contexts, and lived experiences recognized and intentionally incorporated in his teaching, service, mentorship, and research.

Dr. Liboro also obtained a Doctor of Medicine degree in the Philippines (his country of origin), and brings to his teaching and research at UNLV medical knowledge, clinical expertise, and work experiences from his years of practice as a Filipino physician and surgeon, and a Canadian clinical and community-engaged researcher.

Colleen Parks

I conduct research on long-term episodic memory, with a focus on recognition. I investigate questions about different processes and representations that underlie our memories. Aside from gaining a better understanding of memory in general, one of my major aims is to understand how well our theories and models of memory work; how well do they describe and predict behavior? I primarily use behavioral measures and process models to investigate theories of memory, focusing on topics like unitization, relationships between memory processes, item vs. relational memory, recollection, familiarity, forgetting, and reconsolidation.

Joel Snyder

Dr. Snyder received a Ph.D. in Psychology from Cornell University and was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Toronto and Harvard University before starting the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at UNLV. He is an expert on auditory perception and its neural basis and has published numerous empirical studies and literature reviews in top psychology and neuroscience journals. His research has been supported by UNLV, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the REAM Foundation. Dr. Snyder’s research accomplishments were recognized with the 2009 Samuel Sutton Award for Early Distinguished Contribution to Human ERPs and Cognition, and the William Morris Excellence in Scholarship Award. He was also the UNLV nominee for the 2018 Nevada Regents’ Researcher Award.

Beiyu Lin

Beiyu Lin is an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She constructs computational models based on ambient sensor data to identify people’s routine behavior patterns and assess their behavior changes; she also develops algorithms to apply these findings to diverse areas. The impact of her multi-disciplinary research collaborations has been reported in multiple publications. Beiyu has received several honors and awards, including the 2021 Best Applied Data Science Paper Award, SIAM International Conference on Data Mining, and 2022 People Choice Award for Young Professional Poster Competition, IEEE Rising Stars. The recipient of several external scholarships, Beiyu has given multiple invited talks and has taught and mentored students from diverse populations.

Edwin Oh

We are a research group that thrives on collaboration. Through our interactions with collaborators, public health labs, and patients we have developed a research program that interrogates the following themes:

1) Wastewater genomics and COVID-19

Wastewater testing has been used for years to investigate viral infections, to study illicit drug use, and to understand the socioeconomic status of a community based on its food consumption. While tools are in place in many states to evaluate the presence of specific viral strains, the community has not needed previously to collaborate on a global scale to standardize procedures to detect and manage COVID-19 transmission. In response to this challenge, our laboratories in Arizona, Nevada, and Washington have developed collection techniques and genomic and bioinformatic approaches to harmonize and visualize the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection and viral mutation rates in communities populated by local citizens and international tourists. Our findings will contribute to the development of best practices in sampling and processing of wastewater samples and genomic techniques to sequence viral strains, an area required for environmental surveillance of infectious diseases, and has the strong potential to improve the clinically predictive impact of the viral genotype on patient care and vaccine utility.

2) Rare neurological conditions

An association between the 16p13.2 copy number variation deletion and seizures has suggested that a) systematic suppression of each of genes in the loci might yield similar neurological phenotypes seen in the 16p13.2 deletion; and b) such genes might be strong candidates for harboring rare pathogenic point mutations. Through these studies, we discovered USP7 as a message capable of inducing abnormal neurological activity in brain organoids, cultured neurons, and loss-of-function mouse models. Together with collaborators at the Foundation for USP7-Related Diseases (www.usp7.org), our studies are centered on the mechanism by which USP7 gene dosage and rare variants can induce pathology. In addition, we have also identified other gene loci that mimic USP7-related disorders in human and animal models.

3) Ciliary biology and neurodevelopmental conditions

Large-scale studies have begun to map the genetic architecture of Schizophrenia. We now know that the genetic contribution to this condition arises from a variety of lesions that include a) rare copy number variants (CNVs) of strong effect; b) common non-coding alleles of mild effect; and c) rare coding alleles that cluster in biological modules. The challenge that has emerged from these studies is the requirement for large sample sizes to detect significant genetic signals. These findings intimate that SZ is genetically heterogeneous and manifesting potentially as a clinically heterogeneous group of phenotypes with discrete physiological drivers. To address this challenge and to complement the ongoing sequencing effort of cross-sectional SZ, we propose to sample individuals with extreme phenotypes (i.e., resistant to treatment: TRS) to potentially discover an enrichment of causal rare variants which would have otherwise not been observed or been difficult to detect in a large, random sampling of SZ. In addition, we will focus on the role of a specific biological module, the pericentriolar material (including the centrosome, basal body, and primary cilium) and how it relates to the development of the brain and behavior through the genomic and functional dissection of PCM1.

Donald Price

A major theme in my research is to understand how species adapt to diverse environmental and biological factors and diverge into new species. The evolutionary changes that permit species to survive and reproduce across a wide range of environments has resulted in a remarkable range of biological complexity.

My research group studies the interplay of behavior, ecology, genetics, and physiology to determine how species adapt to environmental changes and how diversification of populations leads eventually to the formation of new species. One focus of my group is the amazing Hawaiian Drosophila, which boasts up to 1,000 species in several taxonomic groups. Using genome sequencing and gene expression analyses coupled with detailed behavioral and physiological measurements we have identified genes that are involved in temperature adaptation between two species and between two populations within one species along an environmental gradient. We have also identified genes and epicuticular hydrocarbons that are involved in behavioral reproductive isolation and hybrid sterility between species. Initial studies have begun on the interaction with microbes, (bacteria and yeasts) that are important for food, internal parasites/symbionts, and possibly host-plant associations. In collaboration with others, we are also investigating the genetics of Hawaiian bats and birds, Drosophila melanogaster, the invasive Drosophila suzukii, and Hawaiian Metrosideros trees.

Jun Yong Kang

Dr. Kang’s research interests include the development and synthesis of novel organocatalysts, new reaction discovery, synthesis of biologically active organic compounds and biocompatible biomaterials. Especially, N-hetero phosphines will be used as a platform for the synthesis of highly efficient bi-functional organocatalysts. The organocatalysts will be employed for the discovery of new cascade reactions such as asymmetric tandem annulation reaction via a new mode of reactivity, asymmetric fluorination, and the synthesis of biocompatible polymers through Ring-opening polymerization. The developed methodologies will be future applied to the synthesis of biologically active complex molecules.

Rubaiya Murshed

On 2017 Fall, I have started working as a Research Assistant in department of Mechanical Engineering at UNLV. My research is on fabrication and analysis of highly efficient and stable Lead-free Perovskite photovoltaic material to avoid the toxicity of Lead. My current focus is on Cs2SnI6 Perovskite and I am analyzing the effect of additives such as SnF2, Pyrazine and Guanidinum Thiocyanate on the optical and structural properties of that Perovskite. I am also working on the Perovskite device fabrication and its diode characteristics analysis. In future, I would like to work on another novel Perovskite , which is Cs2GeI6. Both this materials are of A2BX6 structured Perovskite and possess promising photovoltaic properties.