Hai Pham

I am currently a postdoctoral fellow working in the Division of Hydrologic Sciences (DHS), at the Desert Research Institute (DRI). I obtained my Ph.D. in Hydrology from LSU. Before I joined DRI in 2016, I worked as a postdoc fellow at LSU.

My research aims to reduce uncertainty in groundwater modeling with focus on developing computer programs for prediction of flow and contaminant movement in porous and fractured media, uncertainty assessment of hydrologic parameters, conceptual models, and scenarios, optimization, and experimental designs using high-performance computing systems. At DRI, I am developing computer models to predict flow and radionuclide transport through fractured rock aquifers at the Pahute Mesa of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS).

I enjoy conducting research and publishing, developing grant proposals as well as teaching university courses and mentoring students.

William Smith Jr

Dr. Smith’s academic career has been built on the integration of environmental science, conservation, development studies, appropriate technology, political ecology, environmental sociology, hazards, geographic, and cross-cultural research. His work has made an impact at the nature-society-sustainability nexus. Recently he has been funded and published in the subareas of climate change, tribal and NGO capacity building, small-island biodiversity, and water.

Expert areas:  Appropriate technology, biodiversity, climate change, coral reef conservation, development, environmental justice, community-based participatory methods, conservation methods and philosophy, drinking water, environmental sociology, GIS/GPS/remote sensing (especially participatory), geographic analysis, hazards, Native Americans, North-South relations, Philippines, political ecology, political economy of the environment, Micronesia, small islands, third-world development, and watershed management.