Erin Hannon

Erin Hannon is faculty in the Psychological and Brain Sciences department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She received a Ph.D. Experimental Psychology in 2005 from Cornell University. Her research program combines her interests in cognition, culture, infant and child development, music and dance, and language. Her research examines how an individual’s culture-specific listening experiences influence his or her perception of music, the similarities and differences between musical and linguistic skills as they develop and perhaps interact during infancy and childhood, how we acquire the ability to move in time with music, and how developmental milestones in music perception might be related to other social, cognitive, and linguistic abilities and behaviors.

Renato Liboro

Dr. Renato (Rainier) Liboro purposefully chose to pursue and obtain his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Community Psychology because it is the one sub-discipline in Psychology that distinctly espouses the principles, traditions, and practices of research collaboration, diversity, inclusion, equity, social justice, community engagement, civic participation, stakeholder partnership, and capacity-building. As a community-based researcher and scholar who openly identifies as a person of color, a sexual minority, an immigrant, and an older adult, Dr. Liboro recognizes all too well the significance and inherent value of having intersecting identities, diverse personal contexts, and lived experiences recognized and intentionally incorporated in his teaching, service, mentorship, and research.

Dr. Liboro also obtained a Doctor of Medicine degree in the Philippines (his country of origin), and brings to his teaching and research at UNLV medical knowledge, clinical expertise, and work experiences from his years of practice as a Filipino physician and surgeon, and a Canadian clinical and community-engaged researcher.

Colleen Parks

I conduct research on long-term episodic memory, with a focus on recognition. I investigate questions about different processes and representations that underlie our memories. Aside from gaining a better understanding of memory in general, one of my major aims is to understand how well our theories and models of memory work; how well do they describe and predict behavior? I primarily use behavioral measures and process models to investigate theories of memory, focusing on topics like unitization, relationships between memory processes, item vs. relational memory, recollection, familiarity, forgetting, and reconsolidation.

Joel Snyder

Dr. Snyder received a Ph.D. in Psychology from Cornell University and was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Toronto and Harvard University before starting the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at UNLV. He is an expert on auditory perception and its neural basis and has published numerous empirical studies and literature reviews in top psychology and neuroscience journals. His research has been supported by UNLV, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the REAM Foundation. Dr. Snyder’s research accomplishments were recognized with the 2009 Samuel Sutton Award for Early Distinguished Contribution to Human ERPs and Cognition, and the William Morris Excellence in Scholarship Award. He was also the UNLV nominee for the 2018 Nevada Regents’ Researcher Award.

Edward Ester

My research examines how people store and manipulate information over short intervals to solve problems and make decisions – what we typically call short-term memory. We use behavioral methods combined with non-invasive measurements of brain activity (primarily EEG and fMRI) to examine many basic questions about short-term memory: how does the brain represent information that’s no longer present in the environment? How are memory representations created, accessed, updated, and deleted when no longer necessary?

Marian Berryhill

My research falls in the domain of cognitive neuroscience. I study how we hold on to a few items in working memory and use them for immediate task demands. My lab investigates what factors matter in getting information into working memory, how we maintain and manipulate information, and how well we retrieve it. For example, we are currently investigating the consequences of familiar and unfamiliar distractor items on older adults’ working memory performance. We use a range of experimental techniques in human participants, some with brain lesions. These include fMRI, fNIRS, tDCS/tACS, and HD-EEG.

Jefferson Kinney

Dr. Jeff Kinney’s research area is behavioral neuroscience with an emphasis in two general areas; the neurobiology of learning & memory and the biological basis of several neurological/psychological disorders. Research projects in Dr. Kinney’s laboratory focus on the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms involved in various types of associative/spatial learning with particular emphasis on glutamate, GABA, and a few neuropeptides. Additional research projects focus on animal models of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and mood disorders. The investigation of these disorders incorporates transgenic models and identifying potential therapeutic targets. The laboratory utilizes psychopharmacological, behavioral genetic, and molecular biology techniques to address experimental questions. Dr. Kinney is open to working with graduate students on other related topics in behavioral neuroscience.