Hans Moosmuller

Dr. Moosmüller’s interests include experimental and theoretical research in optical spectroscopy as well as its applications to atmospheric, aerosol, and climate physics. His research focuses on development and application of real time, in situ measurement methods for aerosol light absorption, scattering, extinction, and asymmetry parameter, and new optical remote sensing techniques. These measurement methods are being used for ambient air monitoring and vehicle, fugitive dust, and biomass burning emission studies. His latest research interests are fast, ultra-sensitive measurements of elementary mercury concentrations and fluxes and aerosol morphology and its influence on aerosol optical properties with a focus on fractal-like chain aggregates found in combustion particles. Dr. Moosmüller has also participated in the planning, fieldwork, and data analysis of several major air quality studies. During his first three years at DRI, he was responsible for the airborne ozone lidar research program under a cooperative agreement with the USEPA.

Before joining DRI, Dr. Moosmüller was at Colorado State University where he investigated Brillouin light scattering of spin waves and millimeter-wave effective line widths in thin metal films. He also did research on high-spectral-resolution lidar and coherent light scattering techniques. This work included the development of supersonic flow measurement techniques and the investigations of spectral line shapes. His earlier work at the Ludwigs-Maximilians Universität in Munich, Germany and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany focused on laser remote sensing.

Heather Holmes

Dr. Holmes is an Assistant Professor, Physics in the Nevada Advanced Autonomous Systems Innovation Center at the University of Nevada, Reno.  Her PhD research focus was experimental investigations to study air pollution, turbulence, meteorology and chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer.  Following her PhD, two visiting researcher positions took her to Asia and Europe where she studied airborne pollen collection and wind energy.  She completed her postdoctoral training at Georgia Tech as part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE, www.scape.gatech.edu) working with engineers, atmospheric scientists and epidemiologists to characterize air pollution mixtures and their associated health effects.  As part of SCAPE, her research focus was to analyze air pollution and air quality modeling data to better understand and quantify how emission sources combine to impact air quality and provide air quality metrics to epidemiologists for use in health assessments.  Her current research interests incorporate numerical weather prediction and chemical transport modeling with field experiments to investigate pollutant accumulation, transport and mixing and provide data for health and public policy assessments.

Andrew Geraci

Experimental Atomic & Optical Physics Lab – Studies interactions between laser-cooled atoms and micro-mechanical oscillators for: quantum information science, quantum simulation, studies of quantum behavior at macro-scales.

Also studies optical-cooling and trapping of dielectric microspheres for: ultra-precision force measurements, investigations of the Casimir effect, searching for non-Newtonian gravity at the micron-scale.

In addition they are investigating new resonant sensors for axion detection, ARIADNE (Axion Resonant InterAction DetectioN Experiment).

William Arnott

Dr. Arnott develops and deploys photoacoustic instruments for measurement of black carbon emission from vehicles in source sampling, and in ambient air quality studies. These measurements are often combined with other real time particulate emission measurements for the larger purpose of establishing detailed knowledge of the conditions giving rise to most of the black carbon and particulate emission to the atmosphere, and their environmental impacts. He teaches courses in the Atmospheric Sciences Program and Physics Department at the University of Nevada, Reno.