Scott McCoy

My research draws from both Earth science and engineering to formulate and test mechanistic, predictive models that quantitatively describe the behavior of surface processes such as floods, landslides, and debris flows. On event or decadal times scales, many surface processes can devastate communities or pose geologic hazards. On geologic time scales, surface processes transport mass and energy across the Earth’s surface to shape the landscapes we live in.

Wendy Calvin

My research specialty is the optical and infrared spectroscopy of minerals and ices, using remote sensing data sets and laboratory analysis to identify and map the surface composition of solid planets in the solar system.

Zoe Harrold

Dr. Zoe Harrold has a Ph.D. in Geomicrobiology with 10 years of experience working in a laboratory setting, designing and executing experiments that quantify the thermodynamics of geochemical and biogeochemical processes occurring in microbe-water-rock systems, including microbe-metal surface adsorption and biogeochemical sulfur, iron and nitrogen cycling. She is passionate about teaching science and strive to create collaborative work environments where students can thrive.

Her research interests include:
Geomicrobiology, low-temperature aqueous geochemistry, microbially mediated mineral dissolution, biogeochemical cycling, heavy metal adsorption and speciation, and metabolic efficency

Winifred Kortemeier

Winifred Kortemeier is a Community College Professor at Western Nevada College.

Graham Kent

Dr. Graham M. Kent is Director of the Nevada Seismological Laboratory/ and Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno. Previous to July 2009, Graham was a Research Geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and had been Director of the Visualization Center at Scripps from 2001-2009. Dr. Kent is a native of South Lake Tahoe, California. He attended San Diego State University, where he studied Geophysics and graduated Valedictorian of the Class of 1985. Soon thereafter, he entered graduate school at Scripps Institution of Oceanography receiving his PhD in 1992.  After a 4-year-long appointment at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Graham returned to Scripps to continue his work in geophysics, with an emphasis toward seismic studies of extensional tectonics, ranging from magma chambers beneath mid-ocean ridges to fault hazards at Lake Tahoe. While at Scripps, he led an effort to use advanced visualization techniques to study faulting and volcanic systems.  Dr. Kent has conducted a variety of studies around the globe, including tsunami and ocean bottom seismic research. He’s mapped earthquake faults beneath Lake Tahoe that have produced tsunamis and most recently has placed important constraints on southern San Andreas Fault recurrence times through mapping cross faults beneath the Salton Sea. More recently, his research interests include mapping fault hazards within the Walker Lane using seismic imagery in lakes and airborne LiDAR on land.

Mary Cablk

Dr. Mary E. Cablk is an expert in detection and systems. In her research she draws upon knowledge from multiple fields such as olfaction, analytical chemistry, learning, cognitive and industrial/occupational psychology, forensics, spatial analysis, pattern analysis, and image processing. Her interests focus on transforming qualitative observation into quantitative data and combining multiple input data types to solve complex challenges related to detection, in a field setting. Her research and expertise has taken her around the world where she has addressed audiences and worked with colleagues on landmine detection, wildlife detection, recovery of human remains, and search and rescue, among others. She works closely with relevant agencies and organizations on development and implementation of credentialing and standards for canine teams in a variety of disciplines. Dr. Cablk has been instrumental in developing a Ph.D. program in forensic anthropology at the University of Nevada Reno, where she is an adjunct professor and mentors graduate students. She is an auxiliary deputy with several county Sheriff Offices in the State of Nevada and is a resource to the State of California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

Expert in remote sensing including olfaction and optical. Uses quantitative methods from multiple input data types to conduct scientific analyses related to detection, including spatial analyses.

Brenda Buck

Dr. Buck’s research focuses on medical geology – in particular how geological materials impact health. Currently, her work focuses on dust and hazards associated with dust exposure including those from asbestiform minerals, arsenic, and other carcinogens. She also performs research to better understand and quantify arid soil processes so that this knowledge can be applied in land use decisions, radionuclide and heavy metal contamination, biologic soil crusts, paleoclimate interpretations, landscape evolution, soil genesis, geomorphic hazards, and other applications.

John “Jay” Arnone

My research focuses primarily on understanding the effects of global environmental change (a.k.a. “climate change”) on the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems, and deciphering the underlying ecological mechanisms driving the responses. This includes the study of how rising atmospheric CO2, changes in ambient temperature, interannual climate variability (e.g. anomalously warm years or heat waves), reductions in biological diversity, and large periodic disturbances (e.g. wildfire) affect plant physiological processes, plant growth and survival, plant populations and plant communities, as well as ecosystem processes and feedbacks. Although my interests in ecology are broad, I am particularly keen on understanding how belowground processes are impacted by changing ambient environmental conditions (e.g. fine root dynamics, activity of soil fauna, soil hydrology and root biology). I attempt to bridge traditional ecological disciplines and seek out collaboration with scientists from other disciplines to address these wider-ranging ecological questions.

My research group and I also apply our expertise to directly address real-world environmental questions and challenges for clients such as the U.S. Department of the Interior, Southern Nevada Water Authority, Sempra Energy, American Vanadium, Washoe County Air Quality Management, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and the Gas Technology Institute.

Lawrence Rudd

Dr. Rudd’s professional interests are in the areas of science education and geomorphology. By following these interests throughout his life, Dr. Rudd has been involved in a delightful combination of learning, researching, and teaching. Regardless of what he is teaching, Dr. Rudd never fails to use science examples and demonstrations to keep learning active. An ardent believer in inquiry-based learning, students in Dr. Rudd’s classes learn science and science teaching methods through active participation in class activities.

Dr. Rudd has wide-ranging experience in education, including 20 years of teaching high school earth science, physics, and geology in Portland, Maine, Pinon, Arizona, and Tucson, Arizona. In Pinon, Arizona Dr. Rudd taught in the first high school built in a remote part of the Navajo nation. Working with diverse student populations is one of Dr. Rudd’s lifelong interests.

In addition to teaching education classes at Nevada State College Dr. Rudd maintains an active interest in the study of landslides and other Earth surface processes and thoroughly enjoys being able to do field work in Southern Nevada and the nearby Colorado Plateau.

Elisabeth “Libby” Hausrath

Dr. Hausrath is an aqueous geochemist and astrobiologist, and the overall theme of her research program is to investigate interactions between water and minerals, and the impacts of life on those interactions. They use a combination of field work, laboratory experiments, and modeling to investigate signatures of aqueous alteration and life, the rates at which these reactions occur, and how they differ on Earth and on other planets such as Mars. Our work helps understand chemical weathering, nutrient release, the formation of soils, and biosignatures on both Earth and Mars.