Allen Gibbs

My lab uses experimental evolution in the laboratory to study how physiological systems evolve. We subject populations of fruitflies (Drosophila) to stressful conditions and investigate how they evolve in response to stress over many generations. Our current major projects involve flies that have been selected for resistance to desiccation and starvation stress for >100 generations. To understand the relevance of this laboratory research to nature, we have also studied several other types of insects and their relatives, including grasshoppers, ants, desert fruitflies, scorpions, etc.

Brett Riddle

Brett Riddle is a Professor in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His research focuses primarily on the history of biodiversity in western North America, with ongoing projects including: historical assembly of the warm desert biotas; phylogeography of Great Basin montane island biotas; and molecular systematics and biogeography of diverse North American rodent groups.

Research in his laboratory spans a broad array of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant groups, but generally asks questions about the history and structure of biological species and communities in western North American deserts, grasslands, and mountains. They use conceptual frameworks ranging from systematics through population genetics; analytical approaches ranging from historical biogeography through phylogeography and landscape genetics; and data that includes DNA sequences as well as morphological variation. Many of these research questions provide a basis to better predict the consequences of human-based landscape alterations and climate changes on the future of biological diversity.